• Active Registered Voters as of
  • Republicans:
  • Democrats:
  • Others:
  • Total:

Restoration of Civil Rights

The Clerk of the Circuit Court provides a list of persons that have been convicted of a felony or a case file of a convicted felon is provided by the Department of State.  In either case a letter of notification is sent to each individual who is registered to vote.  The letter explains how to obtain the restoration of civil rights as well as an affirmation to deny or appeal the information that was obtained. F.S. 98.075(5)

Once the letter is mailed to the individual, the individual has 30 days to respond by telephone or by signed returned affirmation.  If no contact is attempted by the individual, the name and last known address of the individual is published in the local newspaper.  The individual has 30 days to respond to the Supervisor of Elections.  If no response is made from the individual from the published newspaper notice, then the person is removed from the voter registration books. F.S. 98.075(7)

If a voter is removed due to a felony conviction and they would like to restore their voting rights they may contact the Florida Commission on Offender Review  at 850-488-2952.

If a voter believes that they have been erroneously removed from the voter registration books, they may contact Chrisann Warn at the Supervisor of Elections office at 833-5400.

Links that may be helpful to individuals inquiring about Civil Rights Restoration:

Who can I ask for advice?
request for an advisory opinion

How can I apply to have my civil rights restored?

to apply for restoration of civil rights, you may visit: www.fcor.state.fl.us/restoration.shtml

How do I check the status of my civil rights restoration paperwork?

the check the status of restoration of civil rights, you may visit:
https://fpcweb.fcor.state.fl.us/

What is the process to have my civil rights restored?

please refer to the link below:
www.fcor.state.fl.us/restoration.shtml

I have more questions about clemency, where do I go?

more questions and answers are available at:

https://www.fcor.state.fl.us/faq-clemency.shtml

How can I tell if I am eligible? 

(According to the Division of Elections)

 

STANDARDS GOVERNING ELIGIBILITY TO VOTE AFTER A FELONY CONVICTION

A felony conviction in Florida for murder or a sexual offense makes a person ineligible to vote in Florida.
Any other felony conviction in Florida makes a person ineligible to vote in Florida only if:

  1. the person is in prison or jail on the offense;
  2. the person is on parole, probation, or another form of supervision on the offense; or
  3. the person owes a fine or restitution included in the judgment on the offense-but a fine or restitution does not make the person ineligible if the person is unable to pay it. Unpaid fees or costs do not make a person ineligible to vote.

A felony conviction in another state makes a person ineligible to vote in Florida only if the conviction would make the person ineligible to vote in the state where the person was convicted.
A person who is unsure about whether the person owes a fine or restitution that makes the person ineligible to vote may request an advisory opinion from the Florida Division of Elections on a form available from a Supervisor of Elections or the Division or online at . If the Division does not provide an advisory opinion within 21 days, there will be limits on the State's ability to assert that a fine or restitution makes the requesting person ineligible to vote.
Even if a person would be ineligible to vote under the standards set out above, the person is eligible if the person's right to vote has been restored by the Florida Executive Clemency Board.

An offense on which a person was not adjudicated guilty does not make a person ineligible to vote. A misdemeanor conviction does not make a person ineligible to vote.